National News

‘Wall of Vegeta’ blocking the desert in Africa

In Piga, the northernmost part of Ghana, you have to be careful where your feet are falling. You may wander around in a sandy border town where you encounter a tooth-crocodile resident.

The locals here have learned to live dangerously close to these powerful animals. These animals live in the ‘sacred’ pool of proximity. According to local DeMolay narratives, Paige’s first head was rescued by a crocodile during a hunt, after which he issued a decree that no one would harm the animal.

Even today, locals care about, feed and protect crocodiles. Women apparently wash their clothes in fearless ponds, while some brave men swim with them in the pond.

Tourists come to the promise of “friends” crocodiles and are encouraged to take pictures with crocodiles and touch them. If you go back, it is obviously safe to go to them.

But Pega and his crocodile face crossings from the surrounding land. It is on the southern edge of a semi-arid Sahel area spread across Africa, and the area around Piga is protected by delicate sandy soil, protected by landscapes.

Curved trees and barren shrubs have learned to live in the tempestuous part of this drought, and they help to hold the soil.

Beaubab trees are known for their thick branches and tender branches

But as the population of the village of Piga and its suburbs has increased, many trees have been cleared to provide wood for burning and construction and paving the way for farming.

Without these trees it would be difficult to tie the soil together. The strong winds and rain will carry it out and there will be no soil for rooting crops or wild vegetables. The region is slowly turning into a desert.

Jules Ovarigia, an activist for the conservation of the local environment in Pega, said: ‘Our environment is greatly damaged by deforestation. It will have a profound impact on our future generations. So what we have left needs to be saved. ‘

Orygia is now helping build a wall to keep the desert afloat. But this is no ordinary wall of brick, stone and concrete. Rather, it is a living wall or green enclosure of trunks, shoots and leaves so that it holds the almost lifeless desert.

The day before we spoke to them, they had sent their team members to the nearby villages by planting plants in trucks so that groups could be established with the locals. Today they plant mahogany, semi, and most important African tree Beaub, along with Acacia, Kekar and Acacia.

Fully young baobab trees are very appealing. Thick trunks like their rocks and curious branches rising from the sky above them look like something from another world. Beaubabs, which are actually juicy trees, have thoroughly adapted to the harsh and dry climate of the African savannah and can live for more than two thousand years.

The fruits of the scab are dried in the sun for several months and then turn green to brown, after which they are removed.

When these plants are in their 200th year on the Shabbat Shaban, they begin to bear fruit which are hard-peeled and when they begin to ripen in the sun, they become even harder on their branches. The skin is brown and there are completely dry white mattresses inside, which are for a sharp taste.

Thus, the plant that Oriagia’s team is planting is an investment for the future.

Although its fruits are not appetizing, Pega’s value it very much. Traditionally dried ripe fruits are collected by local women and made into sauces or oatmeal or made into a kind of toffee.

But now the work is getting more organized. From December to April, village women go out to collect these fruits. The fruits they bring with them are sorted, smashed in the village and their mattresses removed and grinded by a hound or machine.

The extracted powders are packaged and shipped to Europe where they are smoked, smoked, mixed with ice cream and health foods. It is part of the $ 3.5 billion global market for Beobab, which is said to grow to $ 5 billion over the next five years.

It contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, potassium and steel along with vitamin C, and all companies such as Coca-Cola, Costco, Innocent Smiths, Suja Juice and UK Valley have introduced Beaubac fruit products. This has given new value to a tree that was considered to be of little value in a country like Ghana.

Andrew Hunt, chief executive of Aduna, a healthy food brand that works closely with small breweries in Bebina, Ghana and neighboring country Burkina Faso, says Beowab has a lot of potential.

‘This is a very special tree in Africa and has great cultural value. In some places it is considered sacred where they think the spirits of their ancestors reside. But it was not worth it and was being cut for other crops. ‘

The women are collecting the fruits of the Beauvaib so that they can be taken back to the villages.

Given the benefits of Beaubab’s fruit, demand is increasing. Resident tribes in the barren areas where the tree grows are now being rewarded for their care.

Adona Company buys a 38kg sack of Beaubab fruit for 45 cedi (Ghana’s currency), which costs about $ 8, on which they pay a four-dollar premium.

In the villages where the livelihoods of the working people belong to the same tree, their annual income is less than $ 48, so the amount paid by Adona is very valuable for the women working there. ۔

In addition, Adona has provided money to grow 5,000 trees there last year and is expected to double it this year.

The sandy soil of Ghana is prone to erosion due to lack of trees and other vegetation.

But on the other hand, there are some who are worried that the multinational companies will be affected if they start generating wider demand for these crops. By the way, they can bring in significant revenue and investment in these areas, but they are concerned with land exploitation or endangering botanical diversity, as palm oil trees are now everywhere in Southeast Asia, Central America and South America. Look like

Linsey Stringer, a researcher at the University of Leeds, UK, says that there is a concern that growing the same type of tree or plant of the same kind can exacerbate the problems that can occur in changing land deserts. There are reasons.

At first, it was difficult for women to do anything because they had no means of making money

But on the other hand, there are some who are worried that the multinational companies will be affected if they start generating wider demand for these crops. By the way, they can bring in significant revenue and investment in these areas, but they are concerned with land exploitation or endangering botanical diversity, as palm oil trees are now everywhere in Southeast Asia, Central America and South America. Look like

Linsey Stringer, a researcher at the University of Leeds, UK, says that there is a concern that growing the same type of tree or plant of the same kind can exacerbate the problems that can occur in changing land deserts. There are reasons.

“Although the land is transformed into a desert on a local level, the political and economic dynamics of these decisions are very widespread and far away from these lands. For those who do not exist on these dry lands, it is easy for them to be unaware of what is happening on dry land due to their consumer behavior.

Some villages have found three-wheeled bicycles that have made it easier for them to slip through the bushes as they make their way through the bushes. Women are becoming more independent within their communities and engaging in decision-making in their own homes.

At first, it was difficult for women to do anything because they had no means of making money, says Julius Ouarigia.

“Now she can make money on her own, and she can make decisions at her household level.”

Another benefit, according to Julius Ouarigia, is that the local tribes have realized that they no longer have to use or cultivate trees, but have made rules at the community level to protect the trees.

More trees and more fertile land mean that Piga residents and crocodiles can laugh together for a little while longer.